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Hoosier Mountain Bike Association, Inc. v. Kaler

Court of Appeals of Indiana

March 23, 2017

Hoosier Mountain Bike Association, Inc., City of Indianapolis, and Indy Parks and Recreation, 1 Appellants-Defendants,
v.
Richard Kaler, Appellee-Plaintiff.

         Appeal from the Marion Superior Court The Honorable Cynthia J. Ayers, Judge Trial Court Cause No. 49D04-1209-CT-35642

          ATTORNEYS FOR APPELLANTS Donald E. Morgan Lynne D. Hammer Kathryn M. Box Office of Corporation Counsel Indianapolis, Indiana

          ATTORNEY FOR APPELLEE John F. Townsend, III Townsend & Townsend, LLP Indianapolis, Indiana

          Riley, Judge. [1]

         STATEMENT OF THE CASE[2]

         [¶1] Appellants-Defendants, the City of Indianapolis and Indy Parks and Recreation (the City), [3] appeal the trial court's denial of their motion for summary judgment with respect to Appellee-Plaintiff's, Richard Kaler (Kaler), claims of negligence after Kaler sustained injuries in riding the City's mountain bike trail at Town Run Trail Park.

         [¶2] We reverse.

         ISSUES

         [¶3] The City presents us with four issues on appeal, which we consolidate and restate as follows:

(1) Whether a genuine issue of material fact precluded the entry of summary judgment on Kaler's claim of premises liability; and
(2) Whether a genuine issue of material fact precluded the entry of summary judgment based on the City's claim that Kaler was contributorily negligent.

         FACTS AND PROCEDURAL HISTORY

         [¶4] The City of Indianapolis owns and operates the Town Run Trail Park through its Indy Parks and Recreation department. The Hoosier Mountain Bike Association, Inc. (HMBA) is responsible for maintaining the trails, which have a difficulty rating from beginner through intermediate. In the spring of 2011, an Eagle Scout, as part of his merit badge project, built a new technical trail feature along Town Run's mountain bike trail. The feature can best be described as a banked wooden turn, also known as a berm. A rider, approaching the berm, has three options for completing the turn. First, riders can avoid the berm by staying on the dirt path on its left side. Second, riders can elect to enter the berm and ride it on the low grade, or third, riders can negotiate the turn by riding the berm's more challenging high grade. The entrance onto the wooden turn is fully tapered with the ground, while the exit is only partially tapered. A rider choosing the low grade would exit the berm with a "little jump" off the end of the feature. (City's App. Vol. II, pp. 100-01). A rider exiting on the high grade would have to make a two-foot jump back down to the trail.

         [¶5] By July 9, 2011, Kaler had been mountain biking for approximately four to five years. He described himself as an "experienced" and "better than average" bicyclist. (City's App. Vol. II, pp. 90, 91). Although he was familiar with the trails at Town Run, he had not been on the mountain bike trail since the berm had been constructed several months earlier. "Oftentimes, " Kaler would "try to get an idea of the technical requirements of the trail" and would step off his bike, especially if he saw something within his view "as a danger." (City's App. Vol. II, p. 89). He understood that "on a mountain bike trail there's multiple paths that you can take, one being more dangerous or less dangerous than another." (City's App. Vol. II, p. 89). In fact, Kaler had ridden a "fairly sophisticated" trail before which had a "four or five foot drop." (City's App. Vol. II, pp. 95, 96). While riding a mountain bike, Kaler was "never [] a casual rider. [He] always enjoyed the obstacles[.]" (City's App. Vol. II, p. 100). He "expected to get in a wreck at least every other time [he] rode, and [he] would routinely fall off the bike over obstacles." (City's App. Vol. II, p. 95). "[I]t was just a general consequence of the sport." (City's App. Vol. II, p. 95).

         [¶6] On July 9, 2011, Kaler and his girlfriend took their first trip on the trail. The mountain bike trail is shaped as a "figure 8, " with an approximate length of 6 miles. (City's App. Vol. II, p. 92). When he first approached the berm, Kaler "took the low grade" on the feature. (City's App. Vol. II, p. 95). As he approached the end of the turn, Kaler could see "there was a drop" so he "pull[ed] up on the fork and [did] a little bunny hop[.]" (City's App. Vol II, pp. 102, 101). On their second trip around the course, Kaler's girlfriend decided to take a shorter loop back to the trailhead. She was not as "adventurous" as Kaler and was concerned about getting back to the trailhead before dusk. (City's App. Vol II, p. 92). Despite the approaching darkness, Kaler "wanted to ride the higher grade because [he] knew it was more challenging." (City's App. Vol. II, p. 101). He reached the berm again around 9:30 p.m. Feeling "capable of riding that high line, " Kaler sped up and rode the berm "as high as [he] could possibly ride it with [his] skill set." (City's App. Vol. II, p. 101). As he was near the end of the berm's high grade, he "just saw [him]self lose control [] and just knew he was dropping." (City's App. Vol. II, p. 101). Kaler "didn't see the drop, [nor] was he aware of the drop" at the end of the high grade turn, instead he "thought it tapered off." (City's App. Vol. II, p. 104). Due to the fall, Kaler sustained lacerations to his spleen and kidney. After calling his mother and girlfriend to inform them that he had crashed, he rode his bicycle back to the trail head. That evening, Kaler and his girlfriend went out for dinner.

         [¶7] Around 1:30 a.m. on the following morning, Kaler went to the hospital where he was diagnosed with lacerations to his spleen and kidney. On discharge, Kaler was offered physical therapy but refused it because he "didn't feel it was necessary." (City's App. Vol. II, p. 99). Kaler's recovery ...


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