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Henkels & McCoy, Inc. v. P&G Power, LLC

United States District Court, N.D. Indiana, Hammond Division, Lafayette

February 18, 2015

HENKELS & McCOY, INC., Plaintiff,
v.
P&G POWER, LLC, Defendant.

OPINION AND ORDER

PAUL R. CHERRY, Magistrate Judge.

This matter is before the Court on Henkels & McCoy, Inc.'s Motion for Summary Judgment Against Defendant P&G Power, LLC [DE 46], filed by Plaintiff Henkels & McCoy, Inc. on October 15, 2014. Plaintiff Henkels & McCoy, Inc. ("H&M") filed a Complaint against Defendant P&G Power, LLC ("P&G") on December 10, 2012, alleging breach of contract for P&G's failure to pay all required union dues for its workers in relation to subcontracted storm repair electrical work performed by P&G for H&M. P&G filed an Answer on January 31, 2013. P&G has not filed a response to the instant Motion for Summary Judgment, and the time to do so has passed. The parties orally agreed on the record to have this case assigned to a United States Magistrate Judge to conduct all further proceedings and to order the entry of a final judgment in this case. Therefore, this Court has jurisdiction to decide this case pursuant to 28 U.S.C. ยง 636(c). Because there are no genuine issues of material fact and H&M is entitled to judgment as a matter of law, the Court grants summary judgment in favor of Plaintiff Henkels & McCoy, Inc.

SUMMARY JUDGMENT STANDARD

The Federal Rules of Civil Procedure mandate that motions for summary judgment be granted "if the movant shows that there is no genuine dispute as to any material fact and the movant is entitled to judgment as a matter of law." Fed.R.Civ.P. 56(a). Rule 56 further requires the entry of summary judgment, after adequate time for discovery, against a party "who fails to make a showing sufficient to establish the existence of an element essential to that party's case, and on which that party will bear the burden of proof at trial." Celotex Corp. v. Catrett, 477 U.S. 317, 322 (1986) (citing Fed.R.Civ.P. 56(c)). "[S]ummary judgment is appropriate-in fact, is mandated-where there are no disputed issues of material fact and the movant must prevail as a matter of law. In other words, the record must reveal that no reasonable jury could find for the nonmoving party." Dempsey v. Atchison, Topeka, & Santa Fe Ry. Co., 16 F.3d 832, 836 (7th Cir. 1994) (citations and quotations omitted).

A party seeking summary judgment bears the initial responsibility of informing the court of the basis for its motion and identifying those portions of the pleadings, depositions, answers to interrogatories, and admissions on file, together with the affidavits, if any, that it believes demonstrate the absence of a genuine issue of material fact. See Celotex, 477 U.S. at 323; Fed.R.Civ.P. 56(c). The moving party may discharge its initial responsibility by simply "showing'-that is, pointing out to the district court-that there is an absence of evidence to support the nonmoving party's case." Celotex, 477 U.S. at 325. When the nonmoving party would have the burden of proof at trial, the moving party is not required to support its motion with affidavits or other similar materials negating the opponent's claim. Celotex, 477 U.S. at 323, 325; Green v. Whiteco Indus., Inc., 17 F.3d 199, 201 n.3 (7th Cir. 1994); Fitzpatrick v. Catholic Bishop of Chi., 916 F.2d 1254, 1256 (7th Cir. 1990). However, the moving party, if it chooses, may support its motion for summary judgment with affidavits or other materials, and, if the moving party has "produced sufficient evidence to support a conclusion that there are no genuine issues for trial, " then the burden shifts to the nonmoving party to show that an issue of material fact exists. Becker v. Tenenbaum-Hill Assoc., 914 F.2d 107, 110-111 (7th Cir. 1990) (citations omitted); see also Hong v. Children's Mem'l Hosp., 993 F.2d 1257, 1261 (7th Cir. 1993).

Once a properly supported motion for summary judgment is made, the non-moving party cannot resist the motion and withstand summary judgment by merely resting on its pleadings. See Fed.R.Civ.P. 56(e); Donovan v. City of Milwaukee, 17 F.3d 944, 947 (7th Cir. 1994). Rule 56(e) provides that "[i]f a party fails to properly support an assertion of fact or fails to properly address another party's assertion of fact as required by Rule 56(c), the court may... consider the fact undisputed for purposes of the motion [or] grant summary judgment if the motion and supporting materials-including the facts considered undisputed-show that the movant is entitled to it...." Fed.R.Civ.P. 56(e)(2), (3); see also Anderson v. Liberty Lobby, Inc., 477 U.S. 242, 248-50 (1986). Thus, to demonstrate a genuine issue of fact, the nonmoving party must "do more than simply show that there is some metaphysical doubt as to the material facts, " but must "come forward with specific facts showing that there is a genuine issue for trial. '" Matsushita Elec. Indus. Co. v. Zenith Radio Corp., 475 U.S. 574, 586-87 (1986) (quoting Fed.R.Civ.P. 56(e)).

In viewing the facts presented on a motion for summary judgment, a court must construe all facts in a light most favorable to the non-moving party and draw all legitimate inferences in favor of that party. See Anderson, 477 U.S. at 255; Srail v. Vill. of Lisle, 588 F.3d 940, 948 (7th Cir. 2009); NLFC, Inc. v. Devcom Mid-Am., Inc., 45 F.3d 231, 234 (7th Cir. 1995). A court's role is not to evaluate the weight of the evidence, to judge the credibility of witnesses, or to determine the truth of the matter, but instead to determine whether there is a genuine issue of triable fact. See Anderson, 477 U.S. at 249-50.

MATERIAL FACTS

On August 26, 2011, Plaintiff Henkels & McCoy, Inc. ("H&M") entered into a Subcontract Agreement with Defendant P&G Power, LLC ("P&G"). In relevant part, the Subcontract Agreement provides:

1. The Work. Subcontractor shall perform the following Work (hereinafter called the "Work") and shall provide and pay for all labor, materials, tools, equipment and all other necessary facilities for the execution and completion thereof to Contractor's satisfaction. SEE ATTACHMENT A "SCOPE OF WORK"

(Pl. Br., Exh. 1-A, p. 1). The Scope of Work attachment to the Subcontract Agreement provides that the "Scope of Work" includes, among other things:

MOBILIZATION - ALL LABOR AND EQUIPMENT COSTS
LABOR - INCLUDING ALL OVERHEADS:
Provide Labor for Emergency Storm Restoration as directed by Contractor per the request of Principal, on an hourly basis, Hourly Labor rates include all profit, employee benefits and all overhead cost for home office, job site, executive, superintendent, general foreman, safety representatives, small tools, mechanics, licenses, intellectual property, electronic devices, work reporting and billing, equipment movers, clerical, any travel, all contributions for Federal Unemployment insurance, State Unemployment insurance, ...

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