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12/12/47 MARJASON v. STATE INDIANA

Filed: December 12, 1947.

MARJASON
v.
STATE OF INDIANA



From the Elkhart Superior Court; William E. Wider, Judge.

O'Malley, J.

Author: O'malley

The appellant, together with Rose Masuth, was charged by indictment with the killing of one Leo Masuth, husband of Rose Masuth, by means of poison. The charge contained the allegations that the killing was done "wilfully, purposely, and with premeditated malice."

Rose Masuth entered a plea of guilty to second degree murder and was sentenced to prison for the term of her natural life. The appellant entered a plea of "not guilty" and went to trial. The theory of the State was that the appellant was an accessory to the commission of the act. In support of its theory, the State offered to introduce in evidence three confessions of Rose Masuth and, with the offer, informed the court that they were offered to show only that the crime of murder had been committed and that Rose Masuth had been adJudged guilty thereof. The appellant objected to the introduction of this evidence but the court, after instructing the jury that the three confessions were not to be considered as evidence of the guilt of the appellant, then permitted them to be read to the jury.

Under Art. 1, § 13, of the Constitution of the State of Indiana, the accused in a criminal prosecution is

given a number of rights, among which is a right "to meet the witnesses face to face." Meeting the witnesses face to face must also include the right to cross-examine.

In Dye v. State (1891), 130 Ind. 87, 88, 29 N.E. 771, 772, it is said:

"It is declared by the authorities that the admissions of the thief are not admissible in evidence against the receiver of the stolen goods when not made in the presence of the latter or where no conspiracy exists. Reilley v. State, 14 Ind. 217; Roscoe Crim. Ev. (8th ed.) 53."

On page 89 (page 772 of N.E.) of the above cause it states in effect that if there is a conspiracy, or some evidence of one, declarations or admissions made before the commission of the act are admissible against the parties, but those made after the commission of the crime are not admissible against those not making such declarations or admissions. The rule is ...


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